‘domum dei’, meaning house of god in latin, is the third abandoned architecture photo series by british fine art photographer james kerwin. in this series, kerwin showcases a small handful of the forgotten and derelict churches, chapels and religious buildings across europe, including some in wales, england, france, portugal, italy and poland.phaccording to kerwin, the numbers of churches, chapels and other religious buildings that are closing their doors every year has been increasing for several decades now. in wales, for example, the average sunday attendance to church has fallen to below one per cent of the population. also, the british have lost faith in religion much faster than many areas of the world with the most recent survey stating that britain appeared one of the most irreligious countries on earth, with only 30% calling themselves “religious”. however, the movement away from religion is not just in the united kingdom — in 2017, it is estimated that over 10,000 churches will close their doors worldwide.

Abandoned Building in Beirut, Lebanon by James Kerwin

British photographer James Kerwin spent several weeks in Lebanon capturing the city’s abandoned architecture.

Building Damaged During Civil War in Beirut

Abandoned Building in Beirut, Lebanon by James Kerwin

Building Damaged During Civil War in Lebanon
Abandoned Hammam in Beirut
Abandoned Architecture in Beirut, Lebanon by James Kerwin
Abandoned Building in Beirut, Lebanon by James Kerwin

These spaces show the scars of decades of internal conflict created during Lebanon’s civil wars.

Abandoned Architecture in Beirut, Lebanon by James Kerwin

Building Damaged During Civil War in Beirut
Old Theater in Beirut, Lebanon
Historic Architecture in Beirut

What’s left behind tells the tale of Beirut’s rich cultural history.

Building Damaged During Civil War in Beirut

Abandoned Architecture in Beirut, Lebanon by James Kerwin
Abandoned Building in Beirut, Lebanon by James Kerwin

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